In the anime adaptation of Eiichiro Oda’s One Piece, the scar on Monkey D. Luffy’s face is not defined till far later – and for good motive.

Why would not the One Piece anime reveal the reason for Monkey D. Luffy‘s well-known facial scar? Created by legendary mangaka Eiichiro Oda, One Piece set sail in 1997. Over one thousand chapters and 980-or-so episodes later, the franchise remains to be going sturdy, as Monkey D. Luffy’s Straw Hat crew proceed their seek for Gol D. Roger’s fabled treasure and the legendary island Raftel (or, certainly, Laugh Tale). As One Piece followers of any expertise degree will know, Luffy is an impulsive kind, even for a Shonen Jump protagonist. He’s the kind to leap into battles headfirst, throw his associates off cliffs, and poison himself simply to show some extent.

It’s hardly shocking that Luffy has just a few battle wounds then. The massive X-shaped mark on his chest was added following One Piece‘s two-year time skip – a lingering present from Akainu on the Battle of Marineford (although some keep the wound was inflicted throughout a filler episode) – and Luffy has a curious resistance to poison after his noxious battle with Magellan at Impel Down. But Luffy’s most distinguished scar is undoubtedly the small curved reduce beneath his eye, current from the very starting of One Piece.

Related: One Piece: Pedro’s Death Explained (& Which Episode It Happens)

For anime-only followers, the reason for this scar could be an entire thriller. One Piece initially uncared for to indicate how Luffy got here to have the mark upon his face, leaving viewers to imagine it was merely the results of a childhood misadventure. Manga readers, nevertheless, will know precisely how Luffy’s cheek received blemished. In One Piece‘s very first chapter, a younger Monkey D. Luffy is making an attempt to persuade Red-Haired Shanks to just accept him as a crew mate, with the then two-armed captain merely laughing at this kid’s desires of piracy. To show his dedication and toughness, Luffy takes a knife and stabs himself proper below the attention, leaving Shanks’ crew horrified. Luffy is patched up, everybody drinks to his cavalier perspective and, not lengthy after, the long run “fifth Yonko” eats the Gomu-Gomu Devil Fruit.

Luffy in One Piece

In the anime, nevertheless, One Piece episode 1 begins within the current day, with Luffy rescuing Koby from evil pirates and encountering his first mate, Roronoa Zoro. The Shanks flashbacks do not start till episode 4, they usually skip over the entire face-stabbing incident fully. Why? Probably as a result of a toddler shoving a knife into their eye is not one of the best picture to be placing out in an anime. Japanese animation is well-known for being extra relaxed in its content material in comparison with cartoons within the west, with Sanji puffing away on cigarettes and loads of blood spilled throughout battle scenes. Even so, a toddler knifing themselves within the face throughout episode 1 is only a lawsuit ready to occur, because the youthful finish of One Piece‘s broad viewers raid their kitchens to discover a method to “prove their toughness.”

If that is the case, why was the scene included within the One Piece manga? Traditionally, comics in Japan are much more lenient than anime relating to violent or mature content material. Fortunately, the One Piece anime made up for the dropped scene – albeit solely after Eiichiro Oda’s franchise had already established itself as an trade staple. In 2012, the Episode of Luffy particular was launched to coincide with One Piece Film: Z, separate from the primary anime. This feature-length animation retold Luffy’s origin story, this time together with the eye-stab, which had gone untold on-screen for therefore lengthy. The scene could be included in later flashback sequences, however solely rather more latest choices, corresponding to episode 878 in 2019.

More: One Piece: Every Member Of The Shichibukai Warlords (& How They Joined)

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